For breakfast on a weekend we always have some sort of fried food. Sometimes a huge fry up, other times a nice sausage butty with freshly made breadcakes (cobs, rolls, whatever you call them in your part of the world) and tons of lovely onions stacked so high that they peep out and slide off onto your knee as soon as you take a bite.

Now I spent ages looking for the perfect sausage but I always feel let down. Either the meat content is too low or the sausages leave huge amounts of fat in the pan etc. However the main worry I have is what exactly goes into my weekend banger. I hear stories that they include everything from earholes to ar…… well you can see where I’m going with this.

So what better way to control what goes into your sausage than to make your own! Its not that difficult but its kind of tricky to do it on your own so I recommend finding a willing partner. I made these ones when everyone was out except the dogs and they don’t have steady enough paws for the job 😉 so the photo’s may not be that great.

For these particular bangers I used a recipe from http://forum.sausagemaking.org/ These guys really know their stuff and I’ve bought their casings and curing powders before and have been pleased.

I made this recipe that I believe was originally posted by sausagemaker so many thanks to him for a great recipe.

Lincolnshire Style Sausage, 2 Kg mix
1.000g Pork Shoulder
500g Pork Belly
270g Water (Chilled)
180g Rusk / Breadcrumb
50g Seasoning

Here’s the recipe for the seasoning. This makes enough for two batches so use half and store the rest in an airtight container.

Lincolnshire Sausage Seasoning
50g Salt
5g White Pepper
5g Black Pepper
5g Nutmeg
2g Mace
3g Ginger
1g Allspice
15g Dried sage
14g Corn flour

I used breadcrumbs from a loaf I’d made a couple of days before.

breadcrumbs

breadcrumbs

Here’s a picture of the seasoning all mixed up. It smells really nice and fresh as a lot of the ingredients I ground myself to keep the herbs and spices as fresh as possible.

seasoning

seasoning

I use a mix of meats to get a good fat ratio. This time I used belly, shoulder and a little bit of tenderloin.

cubed meat

cubed meat

Cut the meat up in to manageable chunks. A good tip is to chill the meat for a few hours before as this helps it go through the mincer. My mincer is an attachment for the Kenwood Chef, I’ve found that these can be found quite cheaply on ebay.

I first grind the meat on the coarse setting.

coarse grind

coarse grind

And then on the fine setting. Its easier to do it this way than trying to stress the machine by doing it all in one go.

fine grind

fine grind

Between each step its best to put the meat back in the fridge so it keeps chilled. You do not want the meat getting warm as it would be a breeding place for bacteria!

Now its time to mix the ingredients. I put the minced meat, seasoning, breadcrumbs and water in my kenwood chef and give them a good mix. By now they are beginning to smell like sausages, yummy!

mixed together

mixed together

Now for the fun part. Load the sausagemeat into the kenwood and assemble the sausage making attachment. (remember to refrigerate the meat whilst preparing this stage) Once you start feeding the meat into the casings it takes a steady hand and you let the meat feed through whilst you guide the casings. Its trial and error and you sometimes get bits where the casings aren’t full enough or are full to bursting. You can usually remedy this by squeezing the sausages into shape at the end.

skins

skins

And here you go, my sausages! They aren’t professionally linked but what the heck they taste great! It really is much easier when there are two people. I can eat these bangers knowing that there’s nothing scarey in them. Give them a try and let me know what you think!

sausages

sausages